Tag: Lee Kuan Yew



Without a Federal-Parliamentary System The Philippines Will Remain a Sham Democracy

Democracy is taken from the ancient Greek word δημοκρατία (dēmokratía) which simply means rule of the people. In order to facilitate this, many different systems have been implemented over the years. Among the most democratic systems ever to be employed was the years with varying degrees of pragmatic success and varying […]


Kim And Trump Were Not Alone – Lee Kuan Yew Was Very Much Present Throughout The Singapore Summit

Singapore was chosen as the venue for the historic summit between Kim Jong-un and Donald Trump for many practical reasons, including comparative proximity to the DPRK vis-a-vis the preferred European destinations of US peace conference organisers but also because Singapore could guarantee the safety of both leaders. Moreover, Singapore’s neutral […]




Letting Australia Into ASEAN Would Be Letting an American Wolf In Kangaroo’s Clothing Into A Sheep Pen

ASEAN leaders are considering whether to upgrade Australia to a full member of the block of The Association South East Asian Nations. Encouraged by Indonesian President Joko Widodo, the idea is to integrate Australia with countries that are already vital economic partners and in so doing, allowing Australia to pivot itself […]


The Only People Who Should Fear a Parliamentary Philippines Are Those Who Command No Support

Generally speaking, full-scale parliamentary systems are considered less power than those with a defined or de-facto strong presidential system. Countries like the US, Russia, China, France, Syria, Egypt, Zimbabwe and to a degree South Africa, have become known for strong and influential presidents. Parliamentary systems can produce a strong leader, […]



Virtues and Vices of Media and Press Freedom – from The Philippines and Singapore to The US, South Asia and The Arab World

The settled 20th century consensus on different styles of media regulation has largely been challenged by the pervasiveness of online media which continues to shape national and trans-national dialogues in the 21st century. However, when tracing the development of media regulation in the 20th century, one can learn a great […]